Latest North Korean Developments: U.S. Statements

Please find below statements on recent developments in North Korea by the Extended Deterrence Strategy and Consultation Group, by U.S. Chargé d’affaires Nicole Shampaine and Ambassador Nikki Haley, and readouts of President Donald J. Trump’s calls with world leaders.

IAEA Board of Governors Meeting

September 11-15, 2017

Agenda Item 7(b)

Application of Safeguards in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

                                                                                       

U.S. Statement as delivered by U.S. Chargé d’Affaires a.i. Nicole Shampaine

 

 

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

 

The United States condemns in the strongest possible terms the DPRK’s unlawful nuclear and ballistic missile activities including its sixth nuclear test on September 3, 2017 which it claimed was of a “H bomb for an ICBM.”  North Korea’s latest nuclear test follows the dangerous and reckless August 28 ballistic missile launch over Japan, and two ICBM launches in July.  With its latest nuclear test, the DPRK declared it had attained “the final goal of completing the state nuclear force” drawing closer to its stated objective to be able to attack United States cities with nuclear weapons, as well as cities of other member states.  The DPRK’s provocative and escalatory actions are a clear and unacceptable threat to international peace and security and directly challenge all of us in this Board room.

We must make it clear to the DPRK that it will not achieve the security or the prosperity that it seeks, until it complies with its international obligations and fulfills its commitments to abandon its UN-proscribed nuclear and ballistic missile programs.  The DPRK’s flagrant violations of international law and its disregard for international norms will not lead to acceptance of a nuclear armed state.  Quite the contrary, as demonstrated by the unanimous adoption of UNSCR 2371 and UNSCR 2375 on September 11, 2017, the United States together with the international community stands resolute in our opposition to North Korea’s possession and pursuit of nuclear weapons and their means of delivery.  The international community has spoken.  Through decisive economic and diplomatic pressure—through our concrete actions—we must ensure North Korea hears the unified message of the international community loud and clear, every day, in every available channel.   In every outlet the DPRK uses to attempt to legitimize its unlawful pursuit, including international organizations and bilateral diplomatic relations, our grave concerns need to be echoed and translated into action.

All of us in this Board room must work together to exhaust our efforts to pressure the North Korean regime to change course, uphold its international obligations and commitments, and abandon its unlawful programs.  Full implementation of the UN Security Council Resolutions is critical, but the United States views these measures as the floor, not the ceiling of international efforts to apply maximum pressure on the DPRK.

U.S. policy towards North Korea is clear.  The United States does not seek regime change, the collapse of the regime, an accelerated reunification of the Korean peninsula, or an excuse to garrison troops north of the Armistice Agreement’s Military Demarcation Line.  We do not seek to be a threat to the Kim Jong Un regime.  But let me be clear, the United States has the unquestionable ability and unbending will to defend itself and its allies.  The United States remains ready and willing to engage the North in serious talks, but North Korea has demonstrated that it is not interested.  The international community must speak with a unified voice against destabilizing actions, not create counterproductive equivalences—false equivalences—that cannot serve as the basis for future discussions.

Mr. Chairman,

As we look ahead to next week’s General Conference, the DPRK’s unlawful production of fissile material, together with each and every nuclear and ballistic missile test, warrants a firm and unequivocal response from this Board and all member states.  The United States welcomes the Director General’s 2017 report on the Application of Safeguards in the DPRK.  We remain firmly committed to the IAEA’s essential role in the complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of North Korea.  We greatly appreciate the Secretariat’s efforts to maintain the Agency’s readiness to resume monitoring and verification in the DPRK, welcome the Director General’s announcement that these efforts are to be further enhanced, and commend the Board’s sustained attention to the DPRK’s nuclear file.

In conclusion, the world faces no greater security challenge today than that posed by North Korea.  The complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean peninsula is our overriding priority, and we must apply maximum diplomatic and economic pressure on the Kim Jong Un regime to cease its provocative actions, and abide by its international obligations and commitments.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

###

UNITED STATES MISSION TO THE UNITED NATIONS

Office of Press and Public Diplomacy

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 11, 2017

Ambassador Haley Delivers Remarks at the Adoption of a U.S.-Drafted UN Security Council Resolution Strengthening Sanctions on North Korea

 

Ambassador Nikki Haley, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, delivered remarks following the unanimous adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 2375 on North Korea. The U.S.-drafted resolution includes the strongest sanctions ever imposed on North Korea, with measures targeting its last remaining major exports and reducing about 30 percent of oil provided to North Korea.

 

“Today, we are saying the world will never accept a nuclear-armed North Korea. And today, the Security Council is saying that if the North Korean regime does not halt its nuclear program, we will act to stop it ourselves.”

 

“We are done trying to prod the regime to do the right thing. We are now acting to stop it from having the ability to continue doing the wrong thing. We are doing that by hitting North Korea’s ability to fuel and fund its weapons program. Oil is the lifeblood of North Korea’s effort to build and deliver a nuclear weapon. Today’s resolution reduces almost 30 percent of oil provided to North Korea by cutting off over 55 percent of its gas, diesel, and heavy fuel oil. Further, today’s resolution completely bans natural gas and other oil byproducts that could be used as substitutes for the reduced petroleum. This will cut deep.”

 

“These are by far the strongest measures ever imposed on North Korea. They give us a much better chance to halt the regime’s ability to fuel and finance its nuclear and missile programs. But we all know these steps only work if all nations implement them completely and aggressively.”

 

Full transcript of remarks: https://go.usa.gov/xRMP4

 

Resolution 2375 Fact Sheet: https://go.usa.gov/xRMPg

###

UNITED STATES MISSION TO THE UNITED NATIONS

Office of Press and Public Diplomacy

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 11, 2017

FACT SHEET: Resolution 2375 (2017) Strengthening Sanctions on North Korea

Resolution 2375 (2017), adopted unanimously by the United Nations Security Council on September 11, 2017, strengthens UN sanctions on North Korea in response to the North Korea nuclear test conducted on September 2, 2017. As such, this resolution sends a very clear message to North Korea that the Security Council is united in condemning North Korea’s violations and demanding North Korea give up its prohibited nuclear and ballistic missile programs.

Resolution 2375 (2017) includes the strongest sanctions ever imposed on North Korea. These measures target North Korea’s last remaining major exports by fully banning the export of textiles (nearly $800 million each year) and preventing overseas workers from earning wages that finance the North Korean regime (over $500 million each year), reduces about 30% of oil provided to North Korea by cutting off over 55% of refined petroleum products going to North Korea, and fully bans all joint ventures with North Korea to cut off foreign investments, technology transfers, and other economic cooperation with North Korea. The resolution also includes strong maritime provisions enabling countries to counter North Korean smuggling activities of prohibited exports by sea.

Resolution 2375 (2017) includes the following key elements:

Oil/Petroleum

  • This resolution reduces about 30% of oil provided to North Korea by cutting off over 55% of refined petroleum products going to North Korea.

o   It will achieve this through imposing an annual cap of 2 million barrels per year of all refined petroleum products (gasoline, diesel, heavy fuel oil, etc.)

o   North Korea currently receives a total of about 8.5 million barrels of oil/petroleum: 4.5 million in refined form and 4 million in crude form.

  • The resolution freezes the current amount of crude oil provided to North Korea by banning countries from providing additional crude oil beyond what China provides through the Dandong-Sinuiju pipeline.
  • The resolution also bans the supply to North Korea of all natural gas and condensates — this will prevent North Korea from obtaining substitutes for refined petroleum products.

 

Textiles

  • The resolution bans all North Korean textile exports.
  • Textile exports – North Korea’s largest economic sector that the Security Council had not previously restricted – earned North Korea an average of $760 million in the past three years.
  • Combined with the previous Security Council resolutions, over 90% of North Korea’s publicly reported 2016 exports of $2.7 billion are now banned (coal, textiles, iron, seafood), which does not include revenues from overseas workers.

 

Overseas Laborers

  • This provision we adopt today will eventually deny the regime another half billion dollars each year it takes from the nearly 100,000 North Korean citizens working around the world to earn wages.
  • In order to minimize business disruptions to existing contracts and work authorizations involving North Korean overseas workers, this provision allows existing authorizations to reach their original expiration dates but does not authorize any renewals.

 

Interdiction

  • The resolution provides member states new tools to stop high seas smuggling of prohibited products(e.g., conventional arms, coal, textiles, seafood, etc.).  North Korea has been smuggling coal and iron ore to other countries using very sophisticated evasion techniques by sea.

o   If flag states refuse to allow inspections of suspicious vessels, then the flag state is required to redirect the vessels to a port for inspection.

o   If a flag state or vessel does not cooperate with inspections, then the vessel can be designated for an asset freeze, denied port access, de-registered, and suffer other penalties.

 

Joint Ventures

  • The resolution requires the end of all joint ventures with North Korea. This will not only starve the regime of any revenues generated through such arrangements, it will now stop all future foreign investments and technology transfers to help North Korea’s nascent and weak commercial industries.
  • However, to protect civilian needs of the North Korean people and continue facilitating international commerce involving the North Korean port of Rajin, the China-DPRK hydroelectric power stations on the Yalu River and the Russia-DPRK Khasan-Rajin rail and port project to transshipment of Russian coal to other markets are exempted.

 

Designations

  • The resolution imposes asset freezes on the most important North Korean regime organs: Organizational Guidance Department, Central Military Commission, and Propaganda and Agitation Department that run the DPRK government, military, and keep its people down.
  • The resolution facilitates the listing of additional dual-use items and technology that could be used for WMD or conventional arms-related purposes that will be banned for transfer to and from North Korea.
  • The resolution also facilitates a process to identify vessels caught smuggling prohibited North Korean goods to other countries.

 

###

Readout
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
September 7, 2017

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Heather Nauert:

Yesterday, Secretary Tillerson spoke on the phone with British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson to discuss recent actions taken by the D.P.R.K. Secretary Tillerson and Foreign Secretary Johnson condemned the D.P.R.K’s most recent nuclear test and discussed the need for increased pressure on the D.P.R.K., including through a robust new UN Security Council resolution. Secretary Tillerson and Foreign Secretary Johnson agreed on the need for all countries, including China, to take action to exert diplomatic and economic pressure on the D.P.R.K.

###

 

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

September 06, 2017

Readout of President Donald J. Trump’s Call with President Xi Jinping of China

 

President Donald J. Trump spoke today with President Xi Jinping of China to discuss North Korea’s September 3 test of a powerful nuclear device.  The two leaders condemned North Korea’s latest provocative and destabilizing action and noted North Korea’s current path is dangerous to the world and not in its own interest.  President Trump and President Xi committed to strengthen coordination and take further action with the goal of achieving the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

###

 

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 6, 2017

 

Readout of President Donald J. Trump’s Call with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull of Australia

 

President Donald J. Trump spoke yesterday with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull of Australia to discuss North Korea’s claimed test of a hydrogen bomb on September 3.  The two leaders condemned North Korea’s belligerent actions and confirmed that their two countries will intensify joint efforts to denuclearize North Korea.  President Trump reaffirmed his commitment to defending the homeland, territories, and allies of the United States, using all available diplomatic and military capabilities.  The two leaders also discussed a range of global issues of mutual concern.

###

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 6, 2017

Readout of President Donald J. Trump’s Telephone Call with Prime Minister Theresa May of the United Kingdom

 

President Donald J. Trump spoke yesterday with Prime Minister Theresa May of the United Kingdom to discuss North Korea’s claimed September 3 test of a hydrogen bomb.  They agreed that this latest reckless act only strengthens the world’s determination to confront the growing North Korean threat.  President Trump reiterated that now is not the time to talk to North Korea, and made clear that all options remain open to defend the United States and its allies against North Korean aggression.  The two leaders resolved to continue working closely together on increasing diplomatic and economic pressure on North Korea, and to call on others to do the same.

###

Press Releases: Joint Statement on the Extended Deterrence Strategy and Consultation Group

September 5, 2017

Media Note

Office of the Spokesperson

Washington, DC

September 5, 2017

 

The text of the following statement was released by the Governments of the United States of America and the Republic of Korea.

Begin Text:

North Korea’s dangerous and destabilizing pursuit of nuclear-armed ballistic missiles represents a threat to all nations in the region and beyond. These actions will not alter the ironclad commitment of the United States and the Republic of Korea (ROK) Alliance to defend the ROK. North Korea’s recent provocations and belligerent rhetoric only drives the United States and the ROK to work more closely to defend against and counter this grave threat.

In line with President Donald J. Trump’s and President Moon Jae-in’s decision to regularize the Extended Deterrence Strategy and Consultation Group (EDSCG), the foreign affairs and defense agencies of the two countries have approved a new framework for the group and committed to holding an EDSCG meeting in the near future. This codification highlights the commitment by both partners to more closely consult and coordinate across the whole of our respective governments to strengthen the Alliance’s posture and reinforce the U.S. commitment to extended deterrence.

Going forward, the EDSCG will hold a plenary session annually. A senior level Executive Session will take place in conjunction with the plenary session on years when a U.S.-ROK 2+2 ministerial meeting does not occur. The EDSCG will coordinate whole-of-government efforts to employ all elements of national power to strengthen extended deterrence. Designated officials from both countries will use the EDSCG mechanism to improve the Alliance’s deterrence posture vis-à-vis North Korea through deeper coordination on diplomatic, information, military, and economic actions; to inform the 2+2 ministerial on Alliance efforts and advance whole-of-government deterrence; and to consult on strategic policy issues impacting deterrence and assurance from a regional security perspective.

###

Statement of U.S. Chargé d’affaires Nicole Shampaine
U.S. Mission to International Organizations in Vienna

September 4, 2017 Session of the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization

 

Madam Chair, President Trump reiterated yesterday that North Korea is a rogue State – its words and actions continue to be hostile and dangerous to the entire world. He reaffirmed the commitment of the United States to defend our homeland, territories, and allies using the full range of diplomatic and military capabilities at our disposal. Following a national security meeting with the President and Vice President yesterday, Defense Secretary James Mattis said that Kim Jong-un should heed the United Nations Security Council’s unified voice: all members unanimously agreed on the threat that North Korea poses and they remain unanimous in their commitment to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. Secretary Mattis also reaffirmed that our commitment to the defense of our allies, including the Republic of Korea and Japan, in the face of these threats, remains ironclad.

Madam Chair, we call on all nations to use every available channel and means of influence to make clear to North Korea that further provocations are unacceptable. We also call on all nations to take steps to show there are consequences to North Korea’s escalations. We intend to raise our concerns at the UN Security Council today to bolster international resolve in holding the DPRK accountable. North Korea must be made to understand – through our words and our actions — that the international community is absolutely unified when it comes to condemning and actively opposing its dangerous, provocative, and profoundly destabilizing behavior.

Finally, Madam Chair, we point out that for the sixth time, the PTS has demonstrated its impressive technical capability and the enormous value of the International Monitoring System and the International Data Center. I would like to again thank Executive Secretary Zerbo and the Provisional Technical Secretariat for their timely response to the events on September third and for preparing these vital, comprehensive technical briefings for States Signatories. And I commend you, Madam Chair, for your admirable role in addressing this difficult and fast moving situation.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Remarks at an Emergency UN Security Council Briefing on North Korea

###

Ambassador Nikki Haley
U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations
U.S. Mission to the United Nations
New York City
September 4, 2017

AS DELIVERED

Thank you, Mr. President. And we want to thank you for allowing us to have this prompt meeting, as it’s very urgent. And we also want to thank the Ambassador of Egypt and his team for the steady hand and the calm way in which he lead in this past month.

For more than 20 years, this Security Council has taken actions against North Korea’s nuclear program. And for more than 20 years, North Korea has defied our collective voice. It’s worth taking a few moments to recount some of the history.

In 1993, the Council approved Resolution 825 calling on North Korea to remain in the Nonproliferation Treaty. That didn’t work. North Korea withdrew from the treaty and continued its nuclear pursuit.

In 2006, the Six Party Talks faltered, and North Korea conducted several ballistic missile launches. That led to Resolution 1695 condemning them.

The same year, North Korea conducted its first nuclear test. That led to Resolution 1718, establishing a UN sanctions regime, aiming to stop all nuclear, ballistic missile, and other weapons of mass destruction programs.

After Six Party Talks fell apart again in 2009, North Korea conducted additional missile launches and its second nuclear test. That led to Resolution 1874, which expanded sanctions, including an arms embargo and cargo inspection obligations.

In 2012, the Leap Day Deal failed, and North Korea conducted two new space launches. The Security Council responded with the adoption of Resolution 2087.

Following North Korea’s third nuclear test in 2013, the Council adopted Resolution 2094, expanding sanctions to restrict financial, maritime, aviation, and diplomatic activities.

By 2016, North Korea had conducted its fourth nuclear test and another space launch. They followed that with more missile launches. In response, the Council adopted multiple resolutions expanding sanctions even further, targeting whole sectors of North Korea’s economy.

Finally, this year, the Council got even more serious.

First, we adopted Resolution 2356 designating high-ranking North Korean government officials and the military’s Strategic Rocket Forces Command for individual sanctions. Then, just last month, after the regime’s first two ICBM launches, we adopted Resolution 2371 – the strongest sanctions we have ever imposed on North Korea.

That resolution banned North Korean exports of coal, iron, and seafood, and imposed several other measures that will significantly cut off the revenues needed to fund their nuclear program.

Why did I take the time to go through this history?

To make this point. The United Nations Security Council has spoken with unusual unity and consistency on North Korea. That’s a good thing. Along the way, there have been problems with implementation, and the Council has at times been too slow and too weak; but this is not a situation in which we have allowed divisions among us to stop any action.

Still, here we are.

Despite our efforts over the past 24 years, the North Korean nuclear program is more advanced and more dangerous than ever. They now fire missiles over Japanese air space. They now have ICBM capabilities.

They now claim to have tested a hydrogen bomb. And just this morning, there are reports that the regime is preparing for yet another ICBM launch.

To the members of the Security Council, I must say, “enough is enough.”

We have taken an incremental approach, and despite the best of intentions, it has not worked.

Members of this Council will no doubt urge negotiations and a return to talks. But as I have just outlined, we have engaged in numerous direct and multilateral talks with the North Korean regime, and time after time, they have not worked.

The time for half measures in the Security Council is over. The time has come to exhaust all of our diplomatic means, before it’s too late.

We must now adopt the strongest possible measures.

Kim Jong-Un’s action cannot be seen as defensive. He wants to be acknowledged as a nuclear power. But being a nuclear power is not about using those terrible weapons to threaten others. Nuclear powers understand their responsibilities. Kim Jong-Un shows no such understanding.

His abusive use of missiles, and his nuclear threats show that he is begging for war. War is never something the United States wants. We don’t want it now. But our country’s patience is not unlimited. We will defend our allies and our territory.

The idea that some have suggested of a so-called freeze-for-freeze is insulting. When a rogue regime has a nuclear weapon and an ICBM pointed at you, you do not take steps to lower your guard. No one would do that. We certainly won’t.

The time has come to exhaust all diplomatic means to end this crisis, and that means quickly enacting the strongest possible measures here in the UN Security Council. Only the strongest sanctions will enable us to resolve this problem through diplomacy. We have kicked the can down the road long enough. There is no more road left.

This crisis goes well beyond the UN. The United States will look at every country that does business with North Korea as a country that is giving aid to their reckless and dangerous nuclear intentions.

And what we do on North Korea will have a real impact on how other outlaw nations who seek nuclear weapons choose to conduct themselves in the future.

The stakes could not be higher. The urgency is now.

Twenty-four years of half measures and failed talks is enough. Thank you.

###

 

Additional Remarks at an Emergency UN Security Council Briefing on North

Korea

Ambassador Nikki Haley

U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations

U.S. Mission to the United Nations

New York City
September 4, 2017
AS DELIVERED

Mr. President, due to the urgency of the situation with the nuclear test, as well as the announcement by North Korea that they are planning for another ICBM test, we want to urge the Council to move very quickly on this. I think that North Korea basically has slapped everyone in the face in the international community that has asked them to stop, so the United States will be circulating a resolution that we want to negotiate this week and vote on Monday. So just wanted to let the members know. I know that some are going to Addis, but we wanted to make sure that we will do that on Monday when we can get those negotiations finished.

Thank you.

###

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 4, 2017

 

Readout of President Donald J. Trump’s Call with Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany

 

President Donald J. Trump spoke today with Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany to discuss North Korea’s claimed September 3 test of a hydrogen bomb.  The two leaders condemned North Korea’s continued reckless and dangerous behavior and reaffirmed the importance of close coordination at the United Nations. President Trump noted that this latest provocation only serves to increase the international community’s resolve to counter North Korea’s prohibited activities.  All options to address the North Korean threat are on the table.

###

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 4, 2017

 

Readout of President Donald J. Trump’s Call with President Moon Jae-In of South Korea

 

President Donald J. Trump spoke today with President Moon Jae-in of South Korea to discuss the allied response to North Korea’s claimed September 3 test of a hydrogen bomb.  Both leaders underscored the grave threat that North Korea’s latest provocation poses to the entire world.  The two leaders agreed to maximize pressure on North Korea using all means at their disposal.  They also pledged to strengthen joint military capabilities.  President Trump gave his in-principle approval to South Korea’s initiative to lift restrictions on their missile payload capabilities.  President Trump also provided his conceptual approval for the purchase of many billions of dollars’ worth of military weapons and equipment from the United States by South Korea.

###

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 3, 2017

Readout of President Donald J. Trump’s Call with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan

 

 President Donald J. Trump spoke with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan to discuss North Korea’s claimed test of a hydrogen bomb, on September 3. The two leaders condemned North Korea’s continued destabilizing and provocative actions, confirmed the two countries’ ironclad mutual defense commitments, and pledged to continue close cooperation. President Trump reaffirmed the commitment of the United States to defending our homeland, territories, and allies using the full range of diplomatic, conventional, and nuclear capabilities at our disposal.

###

 

Secretary Mattis Statement at the White House

Press Operations

Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis
Sept. 3, 2017

We had a small group national security meeting today with the President and the Vice President about the latest provocation on the Korean peninsula.
We have many military options, and the President wanted to be briefed on each one of them.
We made clear that we have the ability to defend ourselves and our allies – South Korea and Japan – from any attack. And our commitments among the allies are ironclad.
Any threat to the United States, or its territories – including Guam – or our allies will be met with a massive military response – a response both effective and overwhelming.
Kim Jong Un should take heed the United Nations Security Council’s unified voice – all members unanimously agreed on the threat North Korea poses, and they remain unanimous in their commitment to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula – because we are not looking to the total annihilation of a country – namely, North Korea.
But, as I said, we have many options to do so. Thank you very much.